More thoughts on decarbonisation, flight display and predictive AI

August Roundup

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Nick Clarke
CEO and Co-founder of Greywing. @NickGreywing

This week we are covering:

  1. Decarbonisation
  2. Flight Filters
  3. Predictive Port Call AI

A couple of weeks ago I had a chat with the Head of Innovation for one of our clients and they mentioned the impossibility of predicting and tracking the carbon emissions for their value chain, everything from agents, to bunker suppliers to the flights the crew and corporate were taking. 

It is a critical process because in time everyone from Charterers to Banks will be looking at vessel owners and operators and if they don’t have a decarbonisation plan in place, they will find it harder to get charters and finance.  Rightship is already beginning to assess Vessel’s and Operator’s on this basis.

Value chain emissions fall under Scope 3 emissions and directly impact the ability of shipping companies to achieve IMO 2030 objectives.

It got me thinking, why can’t Greywing deliver carbon emissions data for crew changes?

Clients apply a dollar value to Carbon Emissions 

Some clients have indicated they will apply a dollar cost to carbon emissions per tonne.  So if they can pay more for goods or services and stay under that dollar cost per tonne of carbon, then they will be willing to pay higher (flights) prices to drive down their carbon footprint.​

We are working on carbon emissions scoring for flights, but in future we will incorporate other elements of a crew change including agency, pilot boats, road travel and bunker barges.  Is there anything we have forgotten?

If it contributes carbon, we will give it a score.

Top Flights

Today we release our flight filters “Top Flights”.  We deliver 100’s of flights and to make sure you can see the ones most relevant to you we have developed an optimisation tool where you can pick anything from lowest cost to lowest carbon, or what we recommend as the best overall.

flights

Predictive Ports AI

One of the biggest problems crew managers have described to us is that they do not know where a vessel will call next.  They lose precious time to arrange a crew change when a vessel’s orders change -  the charterer tells the Captain, the Captain tells the Crew Manager, and eventually someone lets the Manning Office know.  It is a slow process and time is wasted.

We have developed data and integrations to predict what a vessel’s forthcoming ports of call will be.  We are currently testing this out on the MR2 Tanker market segment and if it works well we will release it to all shipping segments in the wet and dry markets.

How much help would it be, if you had an extra 24-72 hours to plan a crew change?

If you would like to give it a spin for any MR2 Tanker Vessels let us know and we will set you up on a trial.

Thank you for your continued support!